Urgent warning over huge $ 533 fine for common driving act Aussies have secretly done

Little-known law could see drivers fined $ 533 for an offense almost everyone has done – and it’s not even the most bizarre road rule to be enforced this Easter

  • Australian motorists could face hefty fines due to a slew of unusual road laws
  • The fines range from $ 114 to $ 698 and carry demerit points
  • Few drivers know of these rules let alone follow them

Motorists could be slapped with hefty fines ahead of the Easter long weekend due to a slew of unusual road laws that few Australian drivers obey.

Speeding, drink driving, and drug related offenses account for the bulk of road offenses but there are many lesser-known – in fact, totally unknown – road rules that could catch out even the most conscientious driver.

Motorists planning a road trip this Easter break should take a quick road rule refresher by checking out the list below:

Motorists could be slapped with hefty fines ahead of the Easter long weekend by a slew of unusual road laws that almost all Australians have done. Drivers could be paying up to $ 698 and lose five demerit points for the illegal acts

1. Throwing apple core out of the car window: $ 533 and two demerit points.

Drivers that drop „injurious matter on a road could be fined for littering even if the object is biodegradable. The Queensland law means ‘tossers’ could be fined $ 533 and two demerit points for throwing a banana peel or apple out of their vehicle.

2. Toot horn and wave farewell: $ 698 and three points

NSW drivers could be fined $ 349 for the friendly farewell beep as it constitutes ‘unnecessary use of horn or warning device’. Adding a wave to the cheerful goodbye could double the infringement as ‘part of the body outside the vehicle’ is another $ 349 fine.

Australian motorists could be fined up to $ 534 and could lose a whopping five demerit points if they use their phone to pay at a drive-through

Australian motorists could be fined up to $ 534 and could lose a whopping five demerit points if they use their phone to pay at a drive-through

3. Using your phone to pay at a drive-through: $ 534 fine

The dangers of using a mobile phone are well-documented but the strict laws extend all the way to the drive-through window. Depending on the state, motorists could be fined up to $ 534 and could lose a whopping five demerit points. To avoid the costly fine, Australians have to switch their engine off and have their handbrake on before using a mobile phone to pay for their fast-food meal.

4. Cutting through a service station: $ 349 and three demerit points

Motorists stuck in traffic or queued at a red light and in a hurry to get to their destination could be fined for cutting through a service station. The tempting shortcut is illegal as it falls under the ‘drive on or over footpath’ road rule. The fine, designed to protect pedestrians, could cost drivers $ 349 and three demerit points.

5. Splashing pedestrians: $ 187 fine

In NSW, drivers that deliberately splash individuals waiting for a bus could be fined. Entertaining as it may be, motorists would do well to avoid those puddles. Pedestrians on the footpath are exempt from this odd rule.

NSW drivers could be hit with a double infringement when they beep and wave goodbye to friends and family.  Both 'Unnecessary use of horn or warning device' and 'part of the body outside the vehicle' are $ 349 fines

NSW drivers could be hit with a double infringement when they beep and wave goodbye to friends and family. Both ‘Unnecessary use of horn or warning device’ and ‘part of the body outside the vehicle’ are $ 349 fines

6. Speeding up while being overtaken: $ 344 and two demerit points

This common and infuriating practice sees drivers accelerate when another vehicle attempts to overtake. Drivers caught doing this could cop a $ 344 fine and lose two demerit points in NSW and $ 330 and two demerit points in Victoria.

7. Flash lights to warn others of speed camera or RBT: $ 116 and one point

Although appreciated by many, this ‘community service’ act is illegal. Flashing a vehicle headlights on and off to warn other drivers of police presence is a $ 116 ticket and one demerit point. Previously the infringement referred to the use of high beams in a built-up area but it is now ‘use high beam towards oncoming vehicle’. In NSW drivers can be slapped with the fine if their high beams outside of fog and inclement weather.

8. Drive over nature strip in a school zone: $ 464 fine and four points

Drivers that mount a kerb or median strip while in a school zone could be slapped with the hefty fine no matter how tight the street is or how difficult it is to find a spot to park.

9. Not giving way to horses: $ 130 fine

Although horses are no longer a common means of transport, it is illegal if a motorist does not give way to a hard-to-control horse. The rider would signal that the horse refuses to move by raising a hand and pointing to the horse. Drivers must move to the left, turn off their engine and wait. Drivers who choose to disregard this rule could score a $ 130 fine in Queensland.

10. Leaving your key in the ignition = $ 114 fine

Roughly 1,000 NSW drivers a year are issued a fine for leaving the key in the ignition unattended. Although convenient, motorists are urged to avoid the practice.

It is illegal for drivers not to give way to a hard-to-control horse.  Motorists could be fined $ 130 if they ignore the riders signal that the horse refuses to move

It is illegal for drivers not to give way to a hard-to-control horse. Motorists could be fined $ 130 if they ignore the riders signal that the horse refuses to move

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